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VMware View PowerCLI Active Session Count

I'm just throwing a quickie out there...

 

I originally wanted to create a small ruby or python script that collected the Active Number of View Sessions currently running for a small project we are running internally. Come to find out, there isn't an API available for VMware View (TBD documentation for Horizon 6) so I had to rely on Powershell to do this for me.

 

I'm sure there are PS gurus out there that will tell me they can condense this down to a single line, but that's not how my brain works.

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Discussing Cloud Foundry Summit on The Cloudcast

Big thanks to Aaron Delp (@aarondelp) and Brian Gracely (@bgracely) for inviting me to be a guest on The Cloudcast episode #149. We discussed my time at Cloud Foundry Summit and what it means to enterprises out there. If you are bored with virtualization, you should listen and maybe start seeing the light... i know i did.

 

 

 

A Summary from the show (taken from thecloudcast.net)

 

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Cloud Foundry Summit 2014 - A Review and Perspective

I've lived in a world of VMs for the past few years and since I started learning Ruby on Rails last year, I've seen a whole new light. You hear all the time that software is eating the world but it's starting to really settle in for me. This is where PaaS and Docker start to shine. As applications become less monolithic, the need for VMs diminish. PaaS and Docker are a new frontier.

 

To put it in perspective, check out this slide below from the opening keynote. Software is disrupting every industry and one of the things that Andrew Clay Shafer (@littleidea) said at the end of his final keynote on Wednesday was "If you aren't creating a software company, then someone else is...and you will lose".

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From Zero to Cloud Foundry on vSphere: Part 3 - Deploy Cloud Foundry with BOSH

We're on to Part 3. In Part 1, we deployed MicroBOSH that enables us to deploy BOSH. In Part 2, we deployed BOSH which got us used to using manifest files. The manifest rules all. This is all adapted from the official documentation located at Deploying Cloud Foundry on vSphere.

 

This tutorial will go over the steps it takes to deploy Cloud Foundry on vSphere. Here are the proper steps:

Part 1 - How to install MicroBOSH
Part 2 - Deploy BOSH with MicroBOSH
Part 3 - Deploy Cloud Foundry with BOSH

 

NOTE: This final part has not been 100% verified. The deployment of this Cloud Foundry manifest requires the following infrastructure: 72 vCPUs, 200GB of RAM, and 1 TB of storage. Of course, my home lab doesn't support this so I kept getting timeout errors during the deployment. My problem is that my vCenter server can't keep up with the deployment speed. My vCenter Server Virtual Appliance is only configured with 8GB of RAM but it needs something much beefier to be able to handle the amount of requests. I believe this is the case because my vSphere Web Client would lose connection for a few minutes and when the deployment stopped, the Web Client started responding again. If you do test out this manifest below, please confirm it by mentioning it in the comments below. I will hope to test this in a real lab environment soon.

 

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From Zero to Cloud Foundry on vSphere: Part 2 - Deploy BOSH with MicroBOSH

We're on to Part 2. In Part 1, we deployed MicroBOSH that enables us to deploy BOSH. BOSH is needed to deploy Cloud Foundry. This is all adapted from the official documentation located at Deploying Cloud Foundry on vSphere.

 

This tutorial will go over the steps it takes to deploy Cloud Foundry on vSphere. Here are the proper steps:

Part 1 - How to install MicroBOSH
Part 2 - Deploy BOSH with MicroBOSH
Part 3 - Deploy Cloud Foundry with BOSH

 

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From Zero to Cloud Foundry on vSphere: Part 1 - How to install MicroBOSH

It seems that the teams over at Cloud Foundry give us too much credit. I spent days trying to get Cloud Foundry up and running because of minor snags and glitches. In addition, the documentation to make this all work doesn't exist in a single place, it's all outdated, or isn't descriptive enough. Hopefully this spoon feeding series tutorial will help get you there.

 

This tutorial will go over the steps it takes to deploy Cloud Foundry on vSphere. Here are the proper steps:

Part 1 - How to install MicroBOSH
Part 2 - Deploy BOSH with MicroBOSH
Part 3 - Deploy Cloud Foundry with BOSH

 

Start off with a pristine Ubuntu image. I'm using 12.04.03. Install VMware Tools first, then lets get started adding packages.

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"Build a Vblock" MidLevel Tool v3 Released

One of the tools I created and maintain within VCE is the Vblock Systems MidLevel Tool. I blogged about its 2.0 release back in August of 2013.

 

You can download it in the following places:

 

What's new in v3:

  • Updated Vblock 100 components for new refresh
  • Updated Vblock 200 components for refresh
  • Added AMP2
  • Added new Management Network Layer for Vblock 3x0 and 7x0 since AMP2 removes management switches
  • Removed Vblock 320
  • Added Vblock 340 to represent new components and optional bandwidth enhancements
  • Added Vblock 3x0 & 7x0 Virtualization layer for VMware VDS
  • Added Vblock Specialized System for Extreme Applications
  • Added Vblock Specialized System for High Performance Databases
  • Added Vblock Specialized System for SAP HANA
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vCAC Error Connecting to vCO API - Fixed

I had a problem where my vCAC environment could no longer talk to my vCO APIs. I constantly have to turn off vCAC and bring it back up because of resource constraints in my home lab. For some reason I just thought the services weren't coming up and I realized no amount of reboots were going to fix it.

 

The error was:

 

You cannot perform that action because the system cannot connect to the provider at https://vcac-appliance.kendrickcoleman.c0m:8281/vco/api/.

 

A quick google search led me to this VMTN article Error in vCAC6.0.1 connecting vCO that got me on the right track. Steve Beaver's solution didn't solve my issue, but it's a safe assumption that if you have followed my mulit-part series on vCAC, then you may end up running into this as well.

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ESXi Heartbleed Vulnerability. What can be seen?

A lot of talk about heartbleed lately with OpenSSL. Plenty of blogs talk about it, but I wanted to see what can actually be scraped.

 

This morning I talked a friend of mine I grew up and went to University of Kentucky with that graduated from DePaul with a masters in network security, Austin Diener (@diener) I figured he would be the best place to start for this fact finding mission. He led me to this script located on github OpenSSL heartbeat PoC with STARTTLS support.

 

It's a pretty simple script, point it at your ESXi server with port 443 and watch the magic happen.

 

NOTE: this server is on my LOCAL LAN in a test environment. I don't care if you try to reverse engineer this garbage. (proceed to the bottom for more information)

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A New Facelift

It's been really long overdue. How overdue you ask? Well, kendrickcoleman.com was originally built on Joomla 1.5. Joomla 1.6 was released in January of 2011 and the effort to upgrade would have been just as tough as this move to Joomla 3.2. Joomla 1.5 went completely EOL in April of 2013 so no new patches or security releases were going to come out.

 

So why make the jump? Joomla 3 has really good responsive templates based on Twitter Bootstrap so it works well on any device. In addition, Joomla 1.5 had some major security flaws but I was lucky enough to never get attacked. It was also a good time to give the website a fresh new look that conforms to some modern design.

 

The toughest piece of this migration is that there is no "in-place" upgrade. I have tried to upgrade my site a few times over the past year but it came with sub-par results. All the free tools just never seemed to work good enough. So I finally opened up my wallet and paid for the MigrateMe plug-in. It wasn't cheap, but in the end it was worth every penny. It kept literally everything in tact. Articles, sections, banners, components, stats, etc all migrated over. There were a few anticipated hiccups but it went fairly well.

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